Does a Carbon Tax Work? Ask British Columbia

NY Times
March 1, 2016
Eduardo Porter

VANCOUVER, British Columbia — Ted Cruz says climate change is not happening. Donald Trump says he doesn’t believe in it. Marco Rubio, whose hometown, Miami, is projected to be largely underwater within the not too distant future as ice caps shrink and the sea level rises, argues that government efforts to combat it will “destroy our economy.”

Why this could be an investment opportunity.

Feb. 15, 2016
Toronto Star
By: Tyler Hamilton

Investing directly in green energy projects just became a whole lot easier for Canadians looking to shift their savings away from fossil fuels.

CoPower, a start-up co-headquartered in Toronto and Montreal, has just launched a retail “green bond” that raises money for specific pools of solar, geothermal and energy-efficiency projects.

Here’s how municipalities can reach their sustainability goals

On December 4, over a thousand mayors from around the world will meet in Paris to accelerate the work of local governments on climate change. Many Ontario mayors attending this event will arrive with a starting advantage: more than 150 local governments in the province already have Sustainable Community Plans (SCP)— plans to achieve environmental, social, and economic goals, developed in collaboration with businesses, NGOs and others. Many of these goals support action on climate change.

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About the Project

The goal of this project is to shed light on the relationship between economic activity and the environment by exploring the linkages between changes in our natural capital and our measures of productivity generally, and through the construction of an environmentally adjusted measure of productivity specifically.

While it is now commonly accepted that economic activity and the state of our environment are linked, many economic measures still fail to incorporate the environment – both the things we draw from it and the pollution we release into it. By developing and calculating measures of productivity that include natural capital, Canada may be able to better understand these linkages. This, in turn, may lead to the identification of strategies that can help Canada become more efficient and innovative in the use and protection of natural capital, and thus more productive and more prosperous.

Using the forestry sector as a case study, this project aims to construct an environmentally adjusted measure of multifactor productivity. In doing so, we aim to add another layer of understanding to the environmental and economic performance of this sector. The proposed measure will have relevance to the Canadian economy as a whole.